May 2, 2021 – 5th Sunday of Easter

Rex Yabut
Steward for Media, Engagement & Parish Life

Pastor’s Notebook

A joyful Fifth Sunday of Easter blessings, sisters and brothers in Christ! Thank you, Fr. Jim, for the opportunity to write this week’s Pastor’s Notebook. We have been blessed with several days in a row of beautiful spring sunshine. I am in awe of how everything that’s blooming right now bursts with the simple reminder of the gentleness of God’s love for us.

I also appreciate how the sun simply reflects its rays on the gold mosaic behind our crucifix or highlights the altar or simply fills up the sanctuary. It definitely puts me in a position to think about how I’ve been allowing Jesus to reflect in the areas of my life or highlight and fill every corner of my heart this Easter.

How have we been reflecting God’s love to others—in our community, our family, and friend circles, as we journey to deepen our discipleship? Here are three opportunities to hear the stories of others and how God is working in their lives. May these moments call us to a deeper attentiveness to God’s voice.

Saint Michael Newsletter

I’m excited to share with you that we have partnered with Catholic Stewardship Consultants (CSC). With over 20 years of experience and a team of folks, they will help us take stewardship to the next level at Saint Michael Parish. I met several of them while at the Msgr. McGread Stewardship Conference in Witchita, KS last year. Beginning this month, all of our registered households will receive our first Parish Stewardship Newsletter, just one of the CSC’s many offerings. Each newsletter will have a note from Fr. Jim and focus on three ministry stories from volunteers and/or stewards. I’m also excited to share that the partnership with CSC has allowed us to focus on another important ministry that has become increasingly vital since the pandemic: media. As of this weekend, I have been blessed to transition from Steward of Time, Talent, Treasure and Parish Life to Media, Engagement and Parish Life.

Annual Catholic Appeal

The Annual Catholic Appeal (ACA) has been such a blessing to many folks throughout the archdiocese who are directly impacted by the ministries they support, and these ministries range from CYO to Grief Ministry, Outreach to Youth Ministry, and Catholic School Education to Seminarian Formation. Archbishop Etienne says it well in his letter, “More than ever, it is critical that we carry out this mission through our parishes and many vital ministries throughout the archdiocese. Through your support of the Annual Catholic Appeal, you can help our parishes and the archdiocese recover from the widespread effects of the shutdown from the coronavirus and ensure the continuation of dozens of ministries that carry out the mission of our Catholic Church.” It is also so refreshing that we will hear stories from our parishioners who are involved in ministries directly supported by the ACA—Mary and Pete Holmberg, who are involved in Prison Ministry and Richard “Jack” Ordos, a first-year seminarian studying at Mount Angel Seminary. We will also get the opportunity to hear from Deacon Val Park, another individual who is fast approaching the next step in Holy Orders. If you missed any of the witness stories at Mass this week or next, just visit our YouTube channel to watch them.

Place God First—Three Conversations

Fr. Jim shared a reflection during his homily at a Friday daily Mass regarding Jesus feeding the 5,000. There was a boy who had the barley loaves and fish. Barley loaves and dried fish were common among the poor. The boy probably had that food to share with his family. As Jesus saw the crowd of 5,000, the boy willingly offered all he had. Jesus saw the offering, blessed and broke it, and fed 5,000 people. I’m reminded of the challenge we are presented—am I offering all I have to enter into these conversations with folks and our small group? Am I allowing God to bless and break the areas of my life that need His touch? I pray that my heart may be as open as this young boy’s. The Holy Spirit was so palpable during the time in our small group to share in prayer and to listen to others share of how they encountered God throughout their life. Hearing others break open their own lives and encounters with Jesus (through friends, family, situations, mission trips, ordinary life events, and praying) and then sharing how we can pray for them is definitely deepening the discipleship we are all called to. How is the Holy Spirit calling you to offer all you have to Jesus so that he may bless and break it for someone else?

I continue to be encouraged to press forward on this journey with all of you, my sisters and brothers in Christ, to deepen our discipleship together. May we be strengthened anew during this Easter season as we journey to Pentecost. Christ is risen! He is risen indeed!

In Deo confide,

Rex Yabut
Steward for Media, Engagement & Parish Life

Pastor’s Notebook

A joyful Fifth Sunday of Easter blessings, sisters and brothers in Christ! Thank you, Fr. Jim, for the opportunity to write this week’s Pastor’s Notebook. We have been blessed with several days in a row of beautiful spring sunshine. I am in awe of how everything that’s blooming right now bursts with the simple reminder of the gentleness of God’s love for us.

I also appreciate how the sun simply reflects its rays on the gold mosaic behind our crucifix or highlights the altar or simply fills up the sanctuary. It definitely puts me in a position to think about how I’ve been allowing Jesus to reflect in the areas of my life or highlight and fill every corner of my heart this Easter.

How have we been reflecting God’s love to others—in our community, our family, and friend circles, as we journey to deepen our discipleship? Here are three opportunities to hear the stories of others and how God is working in their lives. May these moments call us to a deeper attentiveness to God’s voice.

Saint Michael Newsletter

I’m excited to share with you that we have partnered with Catholic Stewardship Consultants (CSC). With over 20 years of experience and a team of folks, they will help us take stewardship to the next level at Saint Michael Parish. I met several of them while at the Msgr. McGread Stewardship Conference in Witchita, KS last year. Beginning this month, all of our registered households will receive our first Parish Stewardship Newsletter, just one of the CSC’s many offerings. Each newsletter will have a note from Fr. Jim and focus on three ministry stories from volunteers and/or stewards. I’m also excited to share that the partnership with CSC has allowed us to focus on another important ministry that has become increasingly vital since the pandemic: media. As of this weekend, I have been blessed to transition from Steward of Time, Talent, Treasure and Parish Life to Media, Engagement and Parish Life. 

Annual Catholic Appeal

The Annual Catholic Appeal (ACA) has been such a blessing to many folks throughout the archdiocese who are directly impacted by the ministries they support, and these ministries range from CYO to Grief Ministry, Outreach to Youth Ministry, and Catholic School Education to Seminarian Formation. Archbishop Etienne says it well in his letter, “More than ever, it is critical that we carry out this mission through our parishes and many vital ministries throughout the archdiocese. Through your support of the Annual Catholic Appeal, you can help our parishes and the archdiocese recover from the widespread effects of the shutdown from the coronavirus and ensure the continuation of dozens of ministries that carry out the mission of our Catholic Church.” It is also so refreshing that we will hear stories from our parishioners who are involved in ministries directly supported by the ACA—Mary and Pete Holmberg, who are involved in Prison Ministry and Richard “Jack” Ordos, a first-year seminarian studying at Mount Angel Seminary. We will also get the opportunity to hear from Deacon Val Park, another individual who is fast approaching the next step in Holy Orders. If you missed any of the witness stories at Mass this week or next, just visit our YouTube channel to watch them.

Place God First—Three Conversations

Fr. Jim shared a reflection during his homily at a Friday daily Mass regarding Jesus feeding the 5,000. There was a boy who had the barley loaves and fish. Barley loaves and dried fish were common among the poor. The boy probably had that food to share with his family. As Jesus saw the crowd of 5,000, the boy willingly offered all he had. Jesus saw the offering, blessed and broke it, and fed 5,000 people. I’m reminded of the challenge we are presented—am I offering all I have to enter into these conversations with folks and our small group? Am I allowing God to bless and break the areas of my life that need His touch? I pray that my heart may be as open as this young boy’s. The Holy Spirit was so palpable during the time in our small group to share in prayer and to listen to others share of how they encountered God throughout their life. Hearing others break open their own lives and encounters with Jesus (through friends, family, situations, mission trips, ordinary life events, and praying) and then sharing how we can pray for them is definitely deepening the discipleship we are all called to. How is the Holy Spirit calling you to offer all you have to Jesus so that he may bless and break it for someone else?

I continue to be encouraged to press forward on this journey with all of you, my sisters and brothers in Christ, to deepen our discipleship together. May we be strengthened anew during this Easter season as we journey to Pentecost. Christ is risen! He is risen indeed!

In Deo confide,

Rex Yabut
Steward for Media, Engagement & Parish Life

From Fr. Lou

“The Great Amen”

Amen means yes! I believe it! If we wanted to get to the youths, we could say that amen is the “heck, yes” from Napoleon Dynamite. Throughout the history of the Mass, the most common words that were spoken together by the whole congregation would be “Lord, have mercy” and “Amen.” 

Amen is an assent. It is an assent to the prayer that was begun with the faithful, taken up by the priest, and returned to the faithful for their assent in the prayer to God. Even though Christ’s faithful, the laity, don’t pray any of the other words of the Eucharistic Prayer, they have united themselves to the prayer that the priest has continued to pray that they entered into during the Preface. They are not silent spectators—they enter into the prayer with the fullness of their hearts, minds, and souls. They have united their prayer to Christ and to the words that the priest is praying. Before the Second Vatican Council, Pope Pius XII wrote an encyclical called Mediator Dei in 1947 on the Sacred Liturgy. In it he wrote:

“The cooperation of the faithful is required so that sinners may be individually purified in the blood of the Lamb. For though, speaking generally, Christ reconciled by His painful death the whole human race with the Father, He wished that all should approach and be drawn to His cross, especially by means of the sacraments and the eucharistic sacrifice, to obtain the salutary fruits produced by Him upon it. Through this active and individual participation, the members of the Mystical Body not only become daily more like to their divine Head, but the life flowing from the Head is imparted to the members, so that we can each repeat the words of St. Paul, ‘With Christ I am nailed to the cross: I live, now not I, but Christ liveth in me.’ We have already explained sufficiently and of set purpose on another occasion, that Jesus Christ ‘when dying on the cross, bestowed upon His Church, as a completely gratuitous gift, the immense treasure of the redemption. But when it is a question of distributing this treasure, He not only commits the work of sanctification to His Immaculate Spouse, but also wishes that, to a certain extent, sanctity should derive from her activity.’

“…It is, therefore, desirable, Venerable Brethren, that all the faithful should be aware that to participate in the eucharistic sacrifice is their chief duty and supreme dignity, and that not in an inert and negligent fashion, giving way to distractions and day-dreaming, but with such earnestness and concentration that they may be united as closely as possible with the High Priest, according to the Apostle, ‘Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus.’ And together with Him and through Him let them make their oblation, and in union with Him let them offer up themselves.

“..Now the faithful participate in the oblation, understood in this limited sense, after their own fashion and in a twofold manner, namely, because they not only offer the sacrifice by the hands of the priest, but also, to a certain extent, in union with him. It is by reason of this participation that the offering made by the people is also included in liturgical worship.”

– Mediator Dei, 78, 80, 92.

This is the Amen where we say, “yes, everything that was just offered, it is mine, too, in communion with the whole faithful of Christ throughout the world, and here at this altar, Amen!

For further reading see:

Pius XII, Mediator Dei, 1947

Why Is Participation at Mass So Difficult?!

From Fr. Lou

“The Great Amen”

Amen means yes! I believe it! If we wanted to get to the youths, we could say that amen is the “heck, yes” from Napoleon Dynamite. Throughout the history of the Mass, the most common words that were spoken together by the whole congregation would be “Lord, have mercy” and “Amen.”

Amen is an assent. It is an assent to the prayer that was begun with the faithful, taken up by the priest, and returned to the faithful for their assent in the prayer to God. Even though Christ’s faithful, the laity, don’t pray any of the other words of the Eucharistic Prayer, they have united themselves to the prayer that the priest has continued to pray that they entered into during the Preface. They are not silent spectators—they enter into the prayer with the fullness of their hearts, minds, and souls. They have united their prayer to Christ and to the words that the priest is praying. Before the Second Vatican Council, Pope Pius XII wrote an encyclical called Mediator Dei in 1947 on the Sacred Liturgy. In it he wrote:

“The cooperation of the faithful is required so that sinners may be individually purified in the blood of the Lamb. For though, speaking generally, Christ reconciled by His painful death the whole human race with the Father, He wished that all should approach and be drawn to His cross, especially by means of the sacraments and the eucharistic sacrifice, to obtain the salutary fruits produced by Him upon it. Through this active and individual participation, the members of the Mystical Body not only become daily more like to their divine Head, but the life flowing from the Head is imparted to the members, so that we can each repeat the words of St. Paul, ‘With Christ I am nailed to the cross: I live, now not I, but Christ liveth in me.’ We have already explained sufficiently and of set purpose on another occasion, that Jesus Christ ‘when dying on the cross, bestowed upon His Church, as a completely gratuitous gift, the immense treasure of the redemption. But when it is a question of distributing this treasure, He not only commits the work of sanctification to His Immaculate Spouse, but also wishes that, to a certain extent, sanctity should derive from her activity.’

“…It is, therefore, desirable, Venerable Brethren, that all the faithful should be aware that to participate in the eucharistic sacrifice is their chief duty and supreme dignity, and that not in an inert and negligent fashion, giving way to distractions and day-dreaming, but with such earnestness and concentration that they may be united as closely as possible with the High Priest, according to the Apostle, ‘Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus.’ And together with Him and through Him let them make their oblation, and in union with Him let them offer up themselves.

“..Now the faithful participate in the oblation, understood in this limited sense, after their own fashion and in a twofold manner, namely, because they not only offer the sacrifice by the hands of the priest, but also, to a certain extent, in union with him. It is by reason of this participation that the offering made by the people is also included in liturgical worship.”

– Mediator Dei, 78, 80, 92.

This is the Amen where we say, “yes, everything that was just offered, it is mine, too, in communion with the whole faithful of Christ throughout the world, and here at this altar, Amen!

For further reading see:

Pius XII, Mediator Dei, 1947

Why Is Participation at Mass So Difficult?!

Small Groups

Continuing to Meet for “Three Conversations”

This week small groups meet to have the third conversation, talking about how the work you do and the way you live your life contributes to the ministry and mission of the Church. How do you personally help bring people to Jesus? Group members will discuss what they do that has the greatest impact on people’s faith lives, how they personally help bring people to Jesus, and how they see themselves supporting the mission of the Church. If you are not now in a small group this can be done in your family or with a small group of friends.

If you are not now part of a small group but would like to join one, either in person or virtually, please contact Michaela Moreau at (360) 292-7104 or mmoreau@saintmichaelparish.org

Holy Land Pilgrimage

Walk the footsteps of Jesus with Deacon John and Leanne Bergford — February 14 – 24, 2022

Information and sign-up meeting Wednesday, June 16 at 7pm via Zoom. 

Limited seating | $3,795 per person (double occupancy)

Price includes:

  • Round-trip airfare, including all airline taxes
  • Accommodation in superior hotels
  • All hotel taxes
  • Meals as per itinerary ( Breakfast and Dinner)
  • Land Transportation by deluxe moter coach
  • Comprehensive sightseeing as per itinerary with licensed Christian Guide.
  • All entrance fees as per itinerary

Presented by Holy Land Tours LLC, WA License # 604335480-001-0001- Jiryis Alyateem

(503) 866-5698 | holylandtoursllc@gmail.com

Interested? Questions? Contact Dcn. John at jbergford@saintmichaelparish.org for Zoom link.

FORMED Pick of the Week

This documentary follows the journey of several pilgrims who differ in culture and religious faith but are united in their journey across the Camino de Santiago. Each of them is traveling toward the shrine of St. James the Apostle, whose feast day we celebrate this week.

FPU

On this 5th Sunday of Easter, how much fruit do you bear when teaching your family the principles of financial peace. The task of setting the monthly budget is the vine that threads through all the branches of daily life of the family. These principles will set your family members up to be successful when they launch from your home to their own families. Give the gift of financial peace to the next generation.

FPU Alumni Meeting: Join us on May 22, 10am–noon via Zoom. Sign up for alerts in SMP Connect (Group: Financial Peace University). Anyone who has completed the course is welcome!

FPU Core Team: fpu@saintmichaelparish.org. Our SMP ministry team is here, how can we help?

Facebook: Saint Michael Parish, Olympia—FPU Alumni Closed Group

May: The Month of Mary!

We’re offering a four-week study of the rosary during the month of May on Tuesdays, May 4–25 at 9am via Zoom. The group will learn about different aspects of the rosary, different Marian prayers and pray a different mystery of the rosary together each week.

If you would like to register or  have any questions please contact Michaela Moreau at mmoreau@saintmichaelparish.org or (360) 292-7104.